THE OLD ROMAN xviii

news, views & info

ST THOMAS OF CANTERBURY, MARTYR

Welcome…

… to this eighteenth edition of “The Old Roman” a weekly dissemination of news, views and information for and from around the world reflecting the experience and life of 21C “Old Romans” i.e. western Orthodox Catholics across the globe.
CONTRIBUTIONS… news items, magazine, devotional or theological articles, prayer requests, features about apostolates and parish mission life are ALL welcome and may be submitted via email. Submissions should be sent by Friday for publication the following Sunday.

ORDO w/c Sunday 29th December 2019 Vol I Issue xviii

OFFICEN.B.
S29.12Sunday within the Octave of the Nativity
Com. St Thomas of Canterbury
Com. Octave of the Nativity
Com. Octave of St Stephen 
Com. Octave of St John
Com. Octave of H.Innocents
(W) Missa “Dum medium”
Or & in Europe
St Thomas of Canterbury BM
Com. Octave of the Nativity
Com. Octave of St Stephen 
Com. Octave of St John
Com. Octave of H.Innocents 
(R) Missa “Gaudeamus omnes” 
s.d




d.i
2a) St Thomas
3a) Oct.Nat.
4a) Oct.Stephen
5a) Oct.StJohn
 
6a) Oct.H.Innocents
Gl.Cr.Pref.Nativity
Communicantes.Nat. 


2a) Oct.Nat.
3a) Oct.Stephen
4a) Oct.StJohn
 
5a) Oct.H.Innocents
Gl.Cr.Pref.Nativity
Communicantes.Nat.
M30.12Within the Octave of the Nativity of Our Lord
Com. Octave of the Nativity
Com. Octave of St Stephen 
Com. Octave of St John
Com. Octave of H.Innocents
(W) Missa “Puer natus”
Or in Europe
Sunday within the Octave of the Nativity
Com. Octave of the Nativity
Com. Octave of St Stephen 
Com. Octave of St John
Com. Octave of H.Innocents
Com. Octave of St Thomas
(W) Missa “Dum medium”  
s.d







s.d.
2a) Oct.Nat.
3a) Oct.Stephen
4a) Oct.StJohn
 
5a) Oct.H.Innocents
Gl.Cr.Pref.Nativity
Communicantes.Nat.



2a) Oct. Nativity
3a) Oct.St Stephen
4a) Oct.St John
5a) Oct.H,Innocents

6a) Oct.St Thomas
Gl.Cr.Pref.Nativity
Communicantes.Nat. 
T31.12St Sylvester of Rome BC
Com. Octave of the Nativity
Com. Octave of St Stephen 
Com. Octave of St John
Com. Octave of H.Innocents
Com. Octave of St Thomas
(W) Missa “Sacerdotes tui”
d.2a) Oct. Nativity
3a) Oct.St Stephen
4a) Oct.St John
5a) Oct.H,Innocents

6a) Oct.St Thomas
Gl.Cr.Pref.Nativity
Communicantes.Nat. 
W01.01THE CIRCUMCISION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST
Octave Day of the Nativity
(W) Missa “Puer natus”
d.iiGl. Cr. Pref. Nativity
Communicantes.Nat. 
T02.01Octave Day of St Stephen
Com. Octave of St John
Com. Octave of H.Innocents
Com. Octave of St Thomas
(R) Missa “Sederunt”
s.d2a) Oct.St John
3a) Oct.H.Innocents

4a) Oct.St Thomas
Gl.Pref.Common
F03.01Octave Day of St John
Com. Octave of H.Innocents
Com. Octave of St Thomas
(W) Missa “In medio”
s.d2a) Oct.H.Innocents
3a) Oct.St Thomas
Gl.Pref.Apostles
S04.01Octave of Holy Innocents
Com. Octave of St Thomas
(R) Missa “Ex ore infantium”
s.d2a) Oct.St Thomas
Gl.Alleluia
Pref.Common
S05.01The Vigil of the Epiphany
Com. Octave Day of St Thomas
(W) Missa “Dum medium”
Or in Europe
Octave Day of St Thomas of Canterbury
Com. Vigil of the Epiphany
(R) Missa “Gaudeamus”
s.d


s.d
2a) Oct.St Thomas
3a) de S. Maria
Gl.Cr.Pref.Nativity

2a) Vigil of Epiphany
3a) de S. Maria
Gl.Cr.Pref.Nativity

KEY: A=Abbot A cunctis=of the Saints B=Bishop BD=Benedicamus Domino BVM=Blessed Virgin Mary C=Confessor Com=Commemoration Cr=Creed D=Doctor d=double d.i/ii=double of the 1st/2nd Class E=Evangelist F=Feria Gl=Gloria gr.d=greater-double (G)=Green H=Holy K=King M=Martyr mpal=missae pro aliquibus locis Mm=Martyrs Pent=Pentecost P=Priest PP/PostPent=Post Pentecost PLG=Proper Last Gospel Pref=Preface ProEccl=for the Church (R)=Red s=simple s-d=semi-double Co=Companions V1=1st Vespers V=Virgin v=votive (V)=violet W=Widow (W)=white *Ob.=Obligation 2a=second oration 3a=third oration

Ritual Notes

  • Epiphany is, liturgically, one of the three greatest feasts of the year. It is celebrated as a double of the first class with a privileged octave of the second order. Its colour is white as too its vigil (see attached).
  • The Blessing of Epiphany Waters after Compline on the Eve of the Epiphany or after the reading of the Ninth lesson at Matins, the priest clad in amice, alb, girdle, white stole and cope (if a bishop mitre too, removed for the orations). (See attached pdf.)
  • Matins of the Epiphany begin with a special form. The Invitatory is NOT said, nor Domine, labia mea aperires, nor Deus in adiutorium. After the silent Pater noster, Ave Maria and Creed, the Office begins at once with the first antiphon. This occurs only on the feast itself, NOT during the Octave.
  • In the Epiphany Mass (see attached) a genuflection is made at the words of the Gospel Procidentes adoraverunt eum. In the cathedral and principal church of each place, after the Gospel the movable feasts of the year are announced. If this is done, a white cope is worn by the priest or deacon who proclaims it. The lectern or pulpit may be used. See attached pdf.
  • The Blessing of Epiphany Chalk and of homes (see attached) may be performed at the end of the Epiphany Mass after the Last Gospel or on the Vigil after the Blessing of Epiphany Waters.

For the attachments referred to above login here

THE CIRCUMCISION OF OUR LORD

January 1st is the feast of the Circumcision of Our Lord but actually three feasts are commemorated today. The first is the Octave Day of the Nativity of Our Lord, hence why so much of the Mass is taken from the Christmas liturgy.
The second feast is a commemoration of Our Lady, the Blessed Virgin Mary as the Mother of God, which is why the station in Rome is at St Mary Major. In former times a second Mass was offered for the Mother of God in this basilica. The Collect, Secret and Postcommunion orations reflect this as do the psalms at Vespers, all from the votive and festal liturgies of Our Lady.
The third feast is that of the Circumcision which has been kept since the 6C. On the eighth day after His Nativity, our Lord Jesus Christ was circumcised in accordance with the Old Testament Law. All male infants underwent circumcision as a sign of God’s Covenant with the holy Forefather Abraham and his descendants [Genesis 17:10-14, Leviticus 12:3].
After this ritual, the Divine Infant was given the name Jesus, as the Archangel Gabriel declared on the day of the Annunciation to the Most Holy Theotokos [Luke 1:31-33, 2:21]. The Fathers of the Church explain that the Lord, the Creator of the Law, underwent circumcision in order to give people an example of how faithfully the divine ordinances ought to be fulfilled. The Lord was circumcised so that later no one would doubt that He had truly assumed human flesh, and that His Incarnation was not merely an illusion, as certain heretics had taught.
In the New Testament, the ritual of circumcision gave way to the Mystery of Baptism, which it prefigured [Colossians 2:11-12]. Accounts of the Feast of the Circumcision of the Lord continue in the Eastern Church right up through the fourth century. The Canon of the Feast was written by Saint Stephen of the Saint Sava Monastery.
In addition to circumcision, which the Lord accepted as a sign of God’s Covenant with mankind, He also received the Name Jesus [Savior] on the eighth day after His Nativity as an indication of His service, the work of the salvation of the world [Matthew 1:21; Mark 9:38-39, 16:17; Luke 10:17; Acts 3:6, 16; Philippians 2:9-10]. These two events – the Lord’s Circumcision and Naming – remind Christians that they have entered into a New Covenant with God and “are circumcised with a circumcision made without hands, in putting off the body of the sins of the flesh by the circumcision of Christ” [Colossians 2:11]. The very name “Christian” is a sign of mankind’s entrance into a New Covenant with God.

FEAST OF ST THOMAS OF CANTERBURY

Thomas Becket was a 12th century chancellor and archbishop of Canterbury whose murder resulted in his canonisation.
Thomas Becket was born in around 1120, the son of a prosperous London merchant. He was well educated and quickly became an agent to Theobald, Archbishop of Canterbury, who sent him on several missions to Rome. Becket’s talents were noticed by Henry II, who made him his chancellor and the two became close friends. When Theobald died in 1161, Henry made Becket archbishop. Becket transformed himself from a pleasure-loving courtier into a serious, simply-dressed cleric.
The king and his archbishop’s friendship was put under strain when it became clear that Becket would now stand up for the church in its disagreements with the king. In 1164, realising the extent of Henry’s displeasure, Becket fled into exile in France, and remained in exile for several years. He returned in 1170.
On the 29 December 1170, four knights, believing the king wanted Becket out of the way, confronted and murdered Becket in Canterbury Cathedral.
Becket was made a saint in 1173 and his shrine in Canterbury Cathedral became an important focus for pilgrimage.

THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS

The 12 days of Christmas is the period that in Christian theology marks the span between the birth of Christ and the coming of the Magi, the three wise men. It begins on December 25 (Christmas) and runs through January 6 (the Epiphany, sometimes also called Three Kings’ Day).
The song, “The Twelve Days of Christmas” is an English Christmas carol. From 1558 until 1829, Roman Catholics in England were not permitted to practice their faith openly. Someone during that era wrote this carol as a catechism song for young Catholics. It has two levels of meaning: the surface meaning plus a hidden meaning known only to members of the Church. Each element in the carol has a code word for a religious reality which the children could remember. To fit the number scheme, when you reach number 9, representing the Fruits of the Holy Ghost, the originator combined 6 to make 3, taking the 6 fruits that were similar: the fruit in each parenthesis is the that was not named separately. There are actually Twelve Fruits of the Holy Ghost.
The “True Love” one hears in the song is not a smitten boy or girlfriend but Jesus Christ, because truly Love was born on Christmas Day. The partridge in the pear tree also represents Him because that bird is willing to sacrifice its life if necessary to protect its young by feigning injury to draw away predators.
According to Ann Ball in her book, HANDBOOK OF CATHOLIC SACRAMENTALS:
The two turtle doves were the Old and New Testaments
The three French hens stood for the three theological virtues of faith, hope, and love; or the three persons of the Holy Trinity.
The four calling birds were the four gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.
The five golden rings represented the first five books of the Old Testament, the Torah, which describe man’s fall into sin and the great love of God in sending a Savior.
The six geese a-laying stood for the six days of creation.
Seven swans a-swimming represented the seven-fold gifts of the Holy Spirit i.e. Wisdom, Understanding, Counsel, Fortitude, Knowledge, Piety, and Fear of the Lord.
The eight maids a-milking were the eight beatitudes. Matthew 5:3–12
Nine ladies dancing were the nine fruits of the Holy Spirit—–Charity, Joy, Peace, Patience [Forbearance], Goodness [Kindness], Mildness, Fidelity, Modesty, Continency [Chastity].
The ten lords a-leaping were the Ten Commandments.
The eleven pipers piping stood for the eleven faithful Apostles.
The twelve drummers drumming symbolised the twelve points of belief in The Apostles’ Creed.

AN OLD ROMAN – Cornelius Steenoven (d. 1725)

Cornelius Steenoven (alternately known as van Steenoven) was an eighteenth-century Dutch Old Roman Catholic bishop. His youth and adolescence are very obscure. However, he received his clerical formation at Louvain and Rome. He received his Doctorate of Theology from the old University of Louvain. In 1689, he was ordained to the priesthood in 1689, and served as a pastor at Amersfoort in the Netherlands from 1692 to 1719. Steenoven served as a canon in the cathedral chapter for the Archdiocese of Utrecht. He was a canon at the time of the supposed Papal suspension of the cathedral chapter in 1700, during a period of tension between the Papacy and Utrecht, during the metropolitan episcopate of Archbishop Pieter Codde. Steenoven was amongst 300 priests from six diocese who in 1700 had protested the juridical grievances suffered by Codde. In 1719, Steenoven was elected vicar general of the cathedral chapter of Utrecht, while the chapter was still supposedly suspended.
On April 27, 1723, the Utrecht chapter convened at The Hague in order to elect a new Archbishop of Utrecht, in accordance with the ancient rights of the Utrecht Providence that granted the Dutch Church autonomy from the Papacy. The chapter opened, as customary, with a votive Mass of the Holy Ghost. The canons adopted a measure to proceed with an election by scrutiny during which Steenoven received the majority of votes and was named Archbishop-elect of Utrecht.
The cathedral chapter and new archbishop-elect petitioned Pope Innocent XIII to confirm the episcopal consecration of Steenoven, but they received no response from Rome. In August, the cathedral chapter sent a second petition to the pope. Once more no response was forthcoming from Rome. At the end of December, the cathedral chapter sent yet a third petition with still no response. Throughout these months, the election of Steenoven as Archbishop-elect of Utrecht became a topic of curiosity and debate throughout Catholic Europe, churchmen wondering whether Rome, given that the chapter was supposedly suppressed, would acknowledge the election and confirm the consecration.
On March 9, 1724, the cathedral chapter of Utrecht sent a missive to all Roman Catholic bishops on the miseries of the Church of Utrecht. This was immediately followed by news of the death of Pope Innocent XIII on March 7. The Pope had not confirmed the episcopal election of Steenoven, yet neither had he condemn it. The chapter and its supporters fervently hoped that Innocent’s successor would support the cause of Utrecht and confirm the elections Steenoven.
On April 8, 1724, the Roman cardinals met in conclave for the election of a new Pope. In their deliberations, the cardinals published a letter in which they admonished the cathedral chapter of Utrecht. Further, the Roman internuncio in the Netherlands denounced the claims and existence of the chapter in a widely-distributed pamphlet addressed to all Catholics throughout Holland. The chapter responded with a firm reply to the internuncio. Additionally, the chapter published a letter urging all Catholic diocesan deans and chapters throughout Europe to support the rights of local church as and resist the Papal usurpation of these rights. The chapter also wrote to the several Catholic universities seeking support for their cause from amongst the theological faculties.
On May 29, 1724, Cardinal Orsini was elected as the new Bishop of Rome, taking the name Pope Benedict XIII. Having appealed to him and received no response, the cathedral chapter of Utrecht appealed neighboring bishops to come to their assistance in the matter of Steenoven’s consecration. The bishops of Bishops of Antwerp, Arras, and Saint-Omer expressed sympathy for the plight of the Church of Utrecht. On July 30, the Bishop of Antwerp consecrated his brother as titular bishop of Rhodes, presumably with Papal approval, but made the shrewd move of doing so alone, without the assistance of two bishops as co-consecrators. None challenged the validity of this episcopal consecrations, and, thus, was assumed by some churchmen to be an encouragement for bishop to act as a sole consecrator for Archbishop-elect Steenoven.
An inquiry was made into the thoughts of French bishops on the matter of Steenoven’s consecration. A 1724 letter to the cathedral chapter of Utrecht revealed that the Bishops of Montpelier, Senez, and Auxerre were in favor of Steenoven’s consecration. Further, the bishops of Bayeux, Pamiers, Macon, Rhodez, Angoulerne, Metz, Troyes, and the ex-bishop of Tourney seemed to be of the same opinion.
On October 13, 1724, some eighteen months following the election of Steenoven as Archbishop-elect of Utrecht, the cathedral chapter wrote to Dominique Marie Varlet, former Bishop of Babylon, who now resided in Amsterdam. They restated their case, saying: “We are as sheep that have no shepherd who may be Christ’s vicar in our Church: by [God], then, Who is the Shepherd and Bishop of our souls, we beseech, entreat, and conjure you to give us the desire of our hearts. What will be your praise in the Catholic Church, if you raise up again a Church that has almost fallen…that when [God] shall renew His signs, and shall do wondrously, it may minister to the execution of His counsels?” Varlet consented to consecrate Steenoven as Archbishop of Utrecht.
Two days later, on October 15, Varlet consecrated Steenoven at Amsterdam in the presence of the cathedral chapter of Utrecht. Although the consecration of Steenoven was done without co-consecrators, without Papal approval, and was seen by many as a schism of the Dutch Church from the Papacy, nevertheless, several Catholic bishops wrote letters of congratulations to Steenoven and the chapter. This consecration has been understood often as the inauguration of Old Roman Catholicism.
After his consecration, Archbishop Steenoven wrote to Pope Benedict XIII and other senior Roman Catholic bishops to inform them of his consecration. In this letter, he explained the principles upon which he and the Dutch clergy had acted, appealing to a future general council of the Church to resolve the matter. On February 21, 1725, Pope Benedict XIII responded to the consecration of Steenoven in wholly negative language, declaring the election null and void and labeling Steenoven’s consecration as “illicit and execrable”, Further, he censured Bishop Varlet.
By the time the Papal letter had reached the Netherlands, Steenoven was seriously ill. He died on April 3, 1725, less than six months after his consecration as Archbishop of Utrecht. He was buried in the Reform Church of Warmond. Following his death, the cathedral chapter again convened to elect a successor to Steenoven. The chapter unanimously elected Barchmann Wuytiers on May 15, 1725 to fill the vacant see. And once again, Varlet served as consecrator for the new Archbishop of Utrecht.

CATECHESIS

One of the greatest impediments to evangelism in the 21C is not the ignorance of non-believers, but of believers! Catechism Classes are currently ongoing around the Communion for all levels of students, those exploring or converting to the faith, those being brought up in the faith and those preparing to be Baptised/Confirmed in the faith.

BACOOR (Philippines) the Mission Parish of Jesus the Divine Mercy offers a catechetical Mass for children on Sunday’s from 10am.

BRIGHTON (UK) the Brighton Oratory holds Catechism Conferences on Saturday mornings for those wishing to deepen and better understand their faith, from 10am following coffee and fellowship after the 0830 Mass.

CHICAGO (USA) the Mission Parish of St Anne‘s is holding classes for explorers and converts contact Fr Thomas Gierke OSF for more information [contact details below].

Of your charity…

For health & well-being…

Christopher, Lyn B, Simon G, Dagmar B, Karen, Debbie G, Fr Graham F, Fr Stephen D, Heather & Susanna L-D, Finley G, Diane C, Pat, Paul, +Rommel B, Penny E, Colin R, John, Ronald, Fr Gerard H, Lilian & family, Ruth L, David G, David P, Patrick H, Debbie G, Karen K, Fr Graham F, S&A, Dave G, +Charles of Wisconsin, +Tissier, Fr Terrence M, +Guo Xijin, +John P, Karl R-W, Fr Antonio Benedetto OSB, Fr Kristopher M & family, Mark Coggan, Ounissa, Ronald Buczek, Rik C, Adrian & Joan Kelly, Juanita Alaniz & family, Shirley V,

For those vocationally discerning…

James, Breandán, Manuel, Vincent, Darren, Akos, Roger, James, Adrian, Carlos, Thomas, Yordanis, Nicholas, Tyler, Micha, Michael, Gaëtan

For the recently departed…

Lauretta (21.01.19), Clive Reed (23.01.19), Fr John Wright (24.01.19), Shelley Luben (11.12.18), Mick Howells (13.12.18), Daniel Callaghan (13.02.19), Alfie (Hub guest), Père Pierre Fournier (08.02.19), Jill Lewis (24.02.19), Cynthia Sharpe Conger (28.02.19), Richard (Ricky) Belmonte, Fr Leo Cameron OSA (29.03.19), Fr John Corbett (30.03.19), Deacon Richard Mulholland (Easter Day), Peter, Bernard Brown (27.06.19), Peter Ellis (01.08.19), Petronila Antonio (10.09.19), Fr Mark Spring (13.09.19), Jean Marchant (15.09.19), Mary Kelly (15.10.19), John Pender (23.10.19)

For those who mourn…

Barbara R & family, Brenda W & family, Joseph S, Catherine L & family, Rev George C & family, Jean C, Margaret & Bonita C, Debbie M & family, Phil E & Family, Adrian Kelly & family, Fr Nicholas Pnematicatos & family

Daily Missal

To accompany your worship why not invest in a St Andrew’s Daily Missal that contains ALL the Propers for ALL the Masses offered throughout the year?
The St Andrew’s Daily Missal also contains historical commentary and footnotes on the Feast days, devotions, prayers of preparation for before and after Mass as well as the Ordinary of the Mass and Propers for Vespers for Sundays and major Feast days throughout the year in Latin and in English. It also contains forms for Morning and Evening Prayer, Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament and Compline. It really is a treasury of devotion!

To order directly from the publishers, visit here $68 = £52.50 approx

Mass Centre Directory

If you would like your mission’s Mass times and other activities included here just submit details via email.

ASIA

PHILIPPINESBacoor Parish of Jesus the Divine Mercy, Copper St. Platinum Ville, San Nicolas III, Bacoor, Province of Cavite

DAYTIMEOFFICE/ACTIVITY
Sundays0600Mass
0800Mass
1000Mass & Children’s Catechesis
1100Baptisms
1700Mass
1st Wed’s1900Mass & O.L. of Perpetual Succour Devotions
1st Frids’1900Mass & Sacred Heart Devotions

PHILIPPINES, Lagunas Parish of San Isidro Labrador, Dita, Sta. Rosa

DAYTIMEOFFICE/ACTIVITY
Sundays0730Mass
1000Baptisms
1st Wed’s1900Mass & O.L. Perpetual Succour Devotions
1st Fri’s1900Mass & Sacred Heart Devotions

EUROPE

UK, Brighton The Brighton Oratory of SS Cuthman & Wilfrid, 1-6 Park Crescent Terrace, Brighton BN2 3HD Telephone +44 7423 074517

DAYTIMEOFFICE/ACTIVITY
Sundays0830Mass & homily
& Daily1000Breaking fast
Wed’s1730Holy Hour & Benediction
1900Conference
Sat’s0830Mass & homily
1000Catechism Conference

UK, Bristol The Little Oratory of Our Lady of Walsingham with Saint Francis, 11 The Primroses, Hartcliffe, Bristol, BS13 0BG

DAYTIMEOFFICE/ACTIVITY
Sundays1030Sermon & Holy Communion
1500Vespers

AMERICAS

USA, Chicago IL Parish Mission of St Anne, Church of the Atonement, 5749 North Kenmore Avenue, Chicago, IL 60660 Telephone: (773) 817 – 5818

DAYTIMEOFFICE/ACTIVITY
Sundays1800Mass & homily (2nd of the month)
Wed’s1930Catechism & Reception Class

USA, Chicago IL Missionary Franciscans of Christ the King, The Friary

DAYTIMEOFFICE/ACTIVITY
Sundays1100Mass

USA, Glendale AZ St. Joseph’s Glendale AZ. Contact address: 7800 N 55th Ave Unit 102162 Glendale AZ 85301 Telephone +1 310 995 3126

DAYTIMEOFFICE/ACTIVITY
Sundays1115Mass

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